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Five University of Melbourne students have been awarded American Australian Association Education Fund Fellowships for up to US$40,000 to undertake advanced research at prestigious American institutions.

University of Melbourne researchers have won Eureka prizes for a climate history of unprecedented scope, leadership in medical data analysis and the discovery of the workings of antibody-generating cells.

University of Melbourne and Alcatel-Lucent researchers helping to deliver energy efficient telecommunications networks have been recognised by the Victorian government for their Excellence in Innovation in Industry Partnerships.

 An international research team has created a ‘global roadmap’ for prioritising road building to balance the competing demands of development and environmental protection.

It used to be that computer models of weather events such as thunderstorms could only be run using powerful - and expensive - supercomputers. Now, however, these kinds of models can be run on the humble laptop. This episode explores this democratisation of weather modelling using the example of a spectacular thunderstorm called 'Hector the Convector'. Dr Chris Chambers produced a computer model of this thunderstorm on his laptop, and shows us how accurate it is by running it side-by-side with a timelapse video of the actual thunderstorm.

Scientists have sequenced the genome and characterised the genes of the Asian liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini.  This parasite causes diseases that affect millions of people in Asia and is associated with a fatal bile duct cancer. 

A team of researchers from the University of Melbourne is leading large-scale field experiments to evaluate how consumers respond to smart meter technologies. 

A new study of satellite sea ice measurements shows that over the last 35 years there have been dramatic changes in sea ice cover around the world.

Eating one to two cups of lightly steamed broccoli a day would help asthmatics to breathe normally and prevent their condition from worsening, University of Melbourne research has determined.

New treatments for inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, diabetes and autism could be on the horizon, after a global University of Melbourne – lead study successfully mapped the genes of a parasitic worm in pigs.

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