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New research reveals almost one in five (18.9 per cent) Australians report chemical sensitivity, with more than one-third (6.5 per cent) medically diagnosed with Multiple Chemical Sensitivities (MCS), suffering health problems from exposure to common chemical products.

University of Melbourne scientists have set a world record in simulating quantum power on a classical computer, demonstrating more quantum data crunching than any of the existing quantum computer prototypes.

Removing tonsils and adenoids in childhood increases the long-term risk of respiratory, allergic and infectious diseases, according to researchers who have examined - for the first time - the long-term effects of the operations.

Australia will still be the lucky country when it comes to changes in local climate as a result of climate change if global average surface temperatures reach the 1.5°C or 2°C limit set by the Paris agreement. 

New research has calculated that without further interventions, the gender gap for women working in STEMM is very likely to persist for generations, particularly in surgery, computer science, physics and maths.

Two new software projects designed in Melbourne could accelerate the progress of the world-first Human Cell Atlas – an ambitious global effort to map every cell in the human body as a resource for understanding, preventing and treating disease.

A new colour publication A Field Guide to the Freshwater Fishes of the Kimberley has been launched, detailing the Kimberley’s fascinating freshwater fishes, many unique to the region, and including newly described species.

Researchers at the University of Melbourne have developed a technique which could increase the sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for patient diagnosis.

For the first time, Australian frog cells have been successfully frozen and re-grown in culture, offering hope of a new technique to safeguard endangered amphibians.

Male moths have evolved intricate scale arrangements on their antennae to enhance detection of female sex pheromones, which allows them to keep their antennae small enough to maximise flying, new research suggests.

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