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Medical artifacts and paraphernalia from the First World War – including a travelling dentistry chair, original medicine bottles and soldier cartoons – are on display at the University of Melbourne’s Medical History Museum.

In a huge boost to the global fight against malaria, researchers have discovered how the malaria parasite protects itself by building resistance against the last-line in antimalarial medications, and how a new medical treatment can overcome the parasite’s defences.

A team of twelve University of Melbourne architecture students, with the support of the MacDonnell Regional Council, have travelled to the remote Indigenous communities of Areyonga and Amoonguna in the Northern Territory to build much-needed sheltering structures alongside the local communities.

The University of Melbourne and The Shrine of Remembrance Trustees are pleased to announce that The Anzac battlefield: landscape of war and memory will be opened today.

Researchers at the University of Melbourne along with international collaborators are using a novel way to block the dengue virus in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes using the insect bacterium Wolbachia and have for the first time provided projections of its public health benefit.

The Melbourne Healthcare Partners Advanced Health Research and Translation Centre, coordinated by Melbourne Health, has been recognised as one of the world’s best for using medical research to improve patient care by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC)

The University of Melbourne along with Pieris Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (OTC:PIRS) today announced a collaboration and funding awarded to advance treatments for diseases such as asthma.

Gay men earn around 20 per cent less than their heterosexual counterparts, while lesbians out-earn heterosexual women by at least 33 per cent, are the findings of a new report, by Professor Mark Wooden at the University of Melbourne and Associate Professor Joseph Sabia from San Diego State University.

An unusual and very exciting form of carbon - that can be created by drawing on paper- looks to hold the key to real-time, high throughput DNA sequencing, a technique that would revolutionise medical research and testing.

Patients suffering from cancer, neurological conditions and infectious diseases will benefit significantly from the most recent round of research funding from the Federal Government’s National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC).   

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