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Nobel laureate Prof Ada Yonath discusses her work on understanding ribosomes -- the protein factories that are found in every cell of every living organism. Presented by Dr Dyani Lewis.
Geneticist Dr Marnie Blewitt explains how epigenetics makes us more than just our genes and how gene inactivation can be crucial to our development. With science host Dr Dyani Lewis.
Social policy researcher Prof Karen Rowlingson discusses the growing inequality in income and wealth in the developed world, how it's researched, and its implications for society and individuals. Presented by Lynne Haultain.
Neuropsychiatrist Prof Chris Pantelis and neural engineering researcher Prof Stan Skafidas discuss the potential for the use of genetics to improve the diagnosis of autism. Presented by Dr Shane Huntington.
Materials scientist Prof David Sholl explains how new hi-tech metal hydrides and metal-organic frameworks can be used to increase the efficiency of nuclear power stations and  to capture carbon dioxide emissions in coal-fired power plants. Presented by Dr Shane Huntington.
Neuroscientist and neurologist Prof Malcolm Horne discusses Parkinson's disease, and examines new technological developments and the prospects they offer for early diagnosis and treatment of the condition. With science host Dr Shane Huntington.
Virologist Prof Vincent Racaniello discusses how poliovirus causes paralysis, and how close we are to eradicating the disease. With science host Dr Dyani Lewis.
Business ethicist Prof Peter Fleming critically examines the concept of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and concludes, that in practice, CSR is tragically compromised. Presented by Elisabeth Lopez.
Political scientist Assoc Prof Virginia Haufler explains how business corporations can reduce the negative impact of their presence, and even build resilience, in the conflict-affected communities and countries in which they operate. Presented by Lynne Haultain.
Bioengineer Prof Donald Ingber discusses how three-dimensional models of living human organs can advance our understanding of human physiology in ways that animal models can't. Presented by Dr Dyani Lewis.

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