AudioSubscribe to Audio

Neuroscientist and science communicator Dr Daniel Glaser discusses the synergistic dividends that arise from research efforts that cross traditional research domains. Presented by Dr Andi Horvath.
Oxford economist Prof Peter Neary talks about new research into international trading firms that reveals some uncomfortable truths for policy makers and governments hoping to pick export winners and encourage startups. Presented by Elisabeth Lopez.
Literary theorist Prof Brian McHale explains the origins and trajectory of postmodernism, muses on its role in our cultural expression, and speculates on its demise. Presented by Lynne Haultain.
Behavioural neuroscientist Prof Anthony Hannan gives a neuro-researcher's view of the dynamic, bidirectional interplay of brain and body, and the protective and destructive implications for both our mental and physical health. Presented by Dr Andi Horvath.
Psychiatrist and clinical researcher Prof David Castle discusses how cannabis represents both a public health risk and a wide-ranging therapeutic opportunity, as the once “evil weed” gains greater legal acceptance for recreational and medical use. Presented by Eric van Bemmel.
Sociologist Prof Chris Greer explores the often murky agendas of organisations, mainstream and social media, and individuals in the facilitation, denial and cover-up of institutional child sex abuse. Presented by Lynne Haultain.
Civil and environmental engineer Prof Anne Steinemann outlines the causes and consequences of poor indoor air quality, and in particular the potentially hazardous fumes generated by home cleaning and personal care products. Presented by Dr Andi Horvath.
Exceptional learning expert Prof John Munro discusses how “giftedness” is assessed in children, how notions of giftedness vary across cultures, adult outcomes for gifted children, and the question of how to handle gifted children at home and in the classroom. Presented by Lynne Haultain.
Alex Halderman and Vanessa Teague, security experts in electronic and internet voting, argue that despite the speed and efficiency promises of e-balloting, it has yet to convincingly deliver the privacy, reliability and vote integrity that the democratic process requires and that voters expect. Presented by Elisabeth Lopez.
Renowned urban theorist Neil Brenner argues that the widespread notion we live in an “urban age” as people move increasingly into cities is fundamentally flawed. He also suggests that “urbanization” be redefined to include the profound impact of city growth on ever more distant hinterlands. Presented by Peter Mares.

Pages