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In our annual PhD episode, two young science researchers discuss their investigations of microbes that threaten, respectively, human health and our food supply. We chat with Claire Gorrie about aspects of the drug-resistant bacterium Klebsiella pneumoniae, and how it's implicated in serious infections. And Rebecca Vandegeer tells us how the Barley Yellow Dwarf virus strips our wheat crops of their defences, posing a threat to food security. Presented by Dr Andi Horvath.
Economic geographer Prof Andrew Leyshon charts the rapid changes in the music industry since the 1990s, how new technologies are changing how music is made and consumed, and how artists are affected. Presented by Peter Clarke.
Bioethicist Peter Sandøe discusses our complicated relationship with animals and associated moral dilemmas, including how our love for companion animals can actually cause harm and the difference between society's treatment of pets and production animals. Presented by Peter Clarke.
Epilepsy researcher Steve Petrou and developmental neuroscientist Mirella Dottori discuss the potential of organoids -- miniature immature organs grown in dishes -- for future epilepsy and autism research. Presented by Dr Andi Horvath.
American labor historian Leon Fink discusses the rise of the Precariat -- people in developed economies in a permanent state of underemployment or intermittent work due to changes in working conditions since the 19th century. Presented by Elisabeth Lopez.
Stem cell expert Megan Munsie and bioethicist Dominique Martin discuss medical tourism and the hidden transnational trade in transplant organs and stem cells,and consider the ethics, legislative implications and what the future might hold. Presented by Elisabeth Lopez.
Plant population specialist Prof Roger Cousens talks about how the spread of undesirable plants, or "weeds", has dramatically redefined the world's natural landscapes and coastlines, and what this means for us economically, aesthetically and environmentally. Presented by Dr Andi Horvath.
Migration researcher Prof Jenny Phillimore explains how the recent global phenomenon of superdiversity is challenging policy makers and service providers to rethink housing and health care in our cities and beyond. Presented by Lynne Haultain.
Environmental historian Prof Harriet Ritvo recounts the often ambiguous relationships between the human and animal worlds through history, and explores our need to both tame and take inspiration from the wild. Presented by Dr Andi Horvath.
Innovation and entrepreneurship researcher Prof Gerry George looks at how organizations are able to leverage constraints to bring creative approaches to lifting and developing social wellbeing. Presented by Elisabeth Lopez.

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