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A University of Melbourne-led research team has cracked the riddle of how flu-killing immunity cells memorise distinct strains of influenza, which could lead to novel cellular memory-implant technologies resulting in a one-shot flu jab for life.

The University of Melbourne has welcomed a $2 million investment by the State government in today’s budget to help plan and develop a National Centre for Proton Beam Therapy (PBT) as part of the Victorian Comprehensive Cancer Centre (VCCC)

Researchers at the University of Melbourne along with international collaborators are using a novel way to block the dengue virus in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes using the insect bacterium Wolbachia and have for the first time provided projections of its public health benefit.

Appetite for Change, a report prepared by leading climate scientists David Karoly and Richard Eckard at the University of Melbourne, reveals the impact that shifting rainfall patterns, extreme weather, warming oceans, and climate-related diseases will have on the production, quality and cost of Australia’s food in the future.

Capping and regulating CEO payments, including performance bonuses, could help make companies more profitable in the long term, new research has found.

Despite an annual public investment of more than $3 billion, nobody knows how many people cycle through Australia’s prisons each year.

Research from the University of Melbourne has put a dollar figure of $85,000 on the time pressure and stress experienced by mothers in the first year of a baby’s life.

Training in public health policy and leadership, improving disability programs and lessons from Australian in tobacco plain packaging policies are some of the collaborative projects in a new Memorandum of Understanding between the University of Melbourne and the Public Health Foundation of India (PHFI).

Believe – the Campaign for the University of Melbourne has reached the significant milestone of $400 million thanks to its latest gift.

Researchers from the University of Melbourne have found that screening for bowel cancer in genetically high-risk populations should begin early.

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