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DNA fingerprinting has revealed how the malaria parasite shuffles genes to create different strains and hide from our immune system. This trick allows the parasite to remain undetected and re-infect the same people, much like the flu.

A team from the University of Melbourne has been honoured with an "Oscar of science" — the Australian Museum’s annual science award, the Eureka Prize — for its work on drug resistance in malaria parasites.

A team from the University of Melbourne has reached the finals of the "Oscars of science" — the Australian Museum’s annual science award, the Eureka Prize — for its work on drug resistance in malaria parasites.

Resistance to a key anti-malarial drug cannot be passed on by mosquitoes in a breakthrough scientists believe could drastically improve the way we battle the disease.

The Australian Research Council has named two academics from the University of Melbourne as recipients of 2015 Laureate Fellowships.

In a huge boost to the global fight against malaria, researchers have discovered how the malaria parasite protects itself by building resistance against the last-line in antimalarial medications, and how a new medical treatment can overcome the parasite’s defences.

Patients suffering from cancer, neurological conditions and infectious diseases will benefit significantly from the most recent round of research funding from the Federal Government’s National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC).   

Senior researcher Dr Sarah Dunstan from the University's Nossal Institute for Global Health describes the signifcance of new malaria research for developing future treatments.

Five genes that have a role in either protecting or making people more susceptible to severe malaria have been identified in a new international study.

Alan Cowman, an Honorary Melbourne professor and researcher at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute has won the Mahathir Science Award in Tropical Research.

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