conservationSubscribe to conservation

Researchers have recorded five new sightings of the critically endangered Leadbeater’s possum, but their location close to existing habitats means the species remains at risk of extinction – particularly from bushfire.

New evidence has raised concerns about the possibility of feral cats preying upon the critically endangered Leadbeater’s possum, with a cat detected on cameras at two nest boxes used by the possums.

For the first time, a breeding technique known as genetic rescue has been shown to increase population numbers and survival rates of the endangered mountain pygmy possum, now at their highest numbers since 1996.

Acclaimed author and conservationist Tim Winton has been announced as patron of the ‘Native Australian Animals Trust’ at the University of Melbourne, which was officially launched on March 15. 

Victoria’s faunal emblem the Leadbeater’s Possum and other species will become extinct within about 30 years unless clear-fell logging stops in Victoria’s Mountain Ash forests, new research based on 30 years of monitoring the forests has found.

Researchers at the University of Melbourne have collected critical insights into wildlife species’ survival that could help future conservation efforts globally.

An international team of researchers has found that female Komodo Dragons live half as long as males on average, seemingly due to their physically demanding ‘housework’ such as building huge nests and guarding eggs for up to six months.

 
A review prepared by the University of Melbourne looks at new methods of water conservation and the need to transform policies and attitudes. The paper describes three emerging methods of addressing shortages: substituting high-quality water with lower-quality water where appropriate, creating drinking water from wastewater and reducing leaks and the volume needed for basic services. 
 

Mt Buller’s Mountain Pygmy-possums have had some rare good news following the success of an emergency action to save the isolated population from extinction caused by declining genetic diversity.

Melbournians are being asked to consider how they can live in harmony with bats at a forum held on April 11 at the University of Melbourne.

Pages