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The nation’s first cross-disciplinary research institute dedicated to maximizing the community benefits of broadband technologies has been announced by Premier John Brumby.

The Victorian Government will provide $2 million for the new Institute for a Broadband-Enabled Society (IBES). The Institute will be based at the University of Melbourne to foster innovation across a wide range of disciplines including Medicine, Engineering, Education, Social Sciences, Economics, Business and the Environmental Sciences.

Professor Rod Tucker, Director of the IBES, says the Institute will source skills and resources of leading University researchers and 10 major industry leaders. Together they will develop and test new products and services which will benefit society, in areas such as e-health, e-education, e-commerce, and environmental monitoring.
 
The IBES has attracted the support of leading global and local companies to join its research program. They include Cisco, Microsoft, Alcatel-Lucent, Telstra, Ericsson, NEC Australia, Optus, Allied Telesis, Pacific Broadband Networks, and Haliplex. The research will also be enhanced by the support of Bell Labs and NICTA, Australia’s national research centre of excellence in Information and Communication Technology.

Professor Tucker says the IBES will serve as a national and international focus for research and innovation across the full spectrum of social, business and technological activities associated with and influenced by the new Australian National Broadband Network.

 “The strong support of industry coupled with the support and commitment of the State Government of Victoria, positions IBES to play a key role in the development of an Australian industry that is ready for the true broadband revolution," he says.

University of Melbourne Vice-Chancellor Professor Glyn Davis says the IBES will be a unique facility that will allow new ideas and applications to be tested in a real broadband environment that will maximize the contribution the Australian Broadband Network will make to Australia’s economic and social progress.

 

A new study has revealed the origins of tiger stripes and a subsurface ocean on Enceladus- one of Saturn’s many moons. These geological features are believed to be the result of the moon’s unusual chemical composition and not a hot core, shedding light on the evolution of planets and guiding future space exploration.

More than 50 of the brightest young minds in science will spend six days in Melbourne this week at the Youth ANZAAS 2009 conference. Students in Years 10, 11 and 12 from Australia and New Zealand will experience the workings of leading scientific establishments.

Consumers will soon be able to compare, buy and reject products based on their greenhouse emissions after the launch of a carbon footprint labelling scheme. Australia will be the third country, after Britain and the US, to get the foot-shaped Carbon Reduction Label, which is being billed as the greenhouse equivalent of a nutritional panel.

Professor Snow Barlow from the School of Land and Environment comments on the importance of the scheme for food security and best practice in standardising greenhouse gas emission reporting for food production.

Galileo knew he had discovered a new planet in 1613, 234 years before its official discovery date, according to a new theory by a University of Melbourne physicist.

A drug banned in Australian horse racing significantly reduces the risk of bleeding in to the lungs in thoroughbreds during racing, a groundbreaking study has found.

The study, which will be published in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association (JAVMA) on July 1, 2009, is the first to draw a definitive link between use of the medication furosemide (also known as frusemide, Lasix or Salix) and the prevention of exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage (EIPH).

A drug banned in Australian horse racing significantly reduces the risk of bleeding in to the lungs in thoroughbreds during racing, a groundbreaking study has found.

A research scientist from the University of Melbourne's Faculty of Veterinary Science has been awarded a prestigious award for young scientists.

With climate change projections indicating extreme weather events will become more frequent and occur with greater intensity, researchers are using the wine industry as a model to examine potential adaptation strategies for food production more generally and are highlighting potential adaptive management strategies.

Staff and alumni from the University of Melbourne’s Faculty of Veterinary Science were recognised at the recent Australian Veterinary Association's awards ceremony at its annual conference in May. Twenty-three awards were presented across a number of areas, with almost half of those awards presented to current or former staff or graduates of the Faculty.

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