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As the 2009 United Nations Climate Change conference gets underway in Copenhagen, see below a list of University of Melbourne experts who can comment on the issues being discussed.

Researchers at the University of Melbourne are calling on the general public to help survey Melbourne’s microbat population to help identify the best habitats for bat conservation. Members who volunteer will join Earthwatch volunteers to understand more about microbats’ behaviour by becoming field research assistants.

Understanding how kangaroos repair their DNA could be the key to preventing skin cancer in the future, according to new research by Dr Linda Feketeová and Dr Uta Wille from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Free Radical Chemistry and Biotechnology at The University of Melbourne. 

Scientists have identified the evolution of venom proteins in lizards such as the Gila Monster, a discovery which could help provide clues to future drug development. The new study reveals extraordinary genetic rearrangements which have produced novel toxins in the Gila Monster and Beaded Lizard venoms. 

A University of Melbourne academic has been awarded US$150,000 in funding to help researchers in Asia and Africa better understand how fungi cause disease. Despite being one of the most significant health problems in many emerging countries, not enough is known about medically important fungi.

A new survey has revealed ways to improve the social acceptance of forest management, while maintaining timber supply and benefiting the environment. The report released by the University of Melbourne provides an insight into Tasmanian community views on forest management methods, applied to the landscape over the long term. It is hoped that this understanding will help forest managers to balance environmental and timber outcomes in a socially acceptable way.

The full transcript of evidence from the1939 'Black Friday' Bushfires Royal Commission has been unearthed at the University of Melbourne, providing a compelling insight into the Royal Commission and fire management practices of 70 years ago.

The noise of traffic, machinery and air conditioners may be driving birds with low-pitched songs away from cities, and leading others to raise the pitch of their singing to be heard above the din.

University of Melbourne Dean of Science Professor Robert Saint has congratulated alumna Professor Elizabeth Blackburn after she became the first Australian woman to be awarded a Nobel Prize.

For the first time for any tropical forest region in the world, leading researchers have produced a compilation of Australian wet tropics research to better coordinate conservation and management efforts of our globally significant rainforests.

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