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It used to be that computer models of weather events such as thunderstorms could only be run using powerful - and expensive - supercomputers. Now, however, these kinds of models can be run on the humble laptop. This episode explores this democratisation of weather modelling using the example of a spectacular thunderstorm called 'Hector the Convector'. Dr Chris Chambers produced a computer model of this thunderstorm on his laptop, and shows us how accurate it is by running it side-by-side with a timelapse video of the actual thunderstorm.

It used to be that computer models of weather events such as thunderstorms could only be run using powerful - and expensive - supercomputers. Now, however, these kinds of models can be run on the humble laptop. This episode explores this democratisation of weather modelling using the example of a spectacular thunderstorm called ‘Hector the Convector'. Dr Chris Chambers produced a computer model of this thunderstorm on his laptop, and shows us how accurate it is by running it side-by-side with a timelapse video of the actual thunderstorm.

Scientists have sequenced the genome and characterised the genes of the Asian liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini.  This parasite causes diseases that affect millions of people in Asia and is associated with a fatal bile duct cancer. 

Variations in high-altitude wind patterns expose particular parts of Europe, Asia and the US to different extreme weather conditions, a new study has shown.

New treatments for inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, diabetes and autism could be on the horizon, after a global University of Melbourne – lead study successfully mapped the genes of a parasitic worm in pigs.

Improved water productivity and increased export incomes are at the heart of a new National water management blueprint launched at the University of Melbourne today.
 

Faster and smaller electronic devices, as well as enhanced fibre optics, are a step closer thanks to new research by scientists at the University of Melbourne and New York University.

Thermal imaging has revealed koalas cope with extreme heat by resting against cooler tree trunks.

A new robotic dairy that uses lasers to detect cow teats, allowing the animals to 'self milk', has been opened in northern Victoria.It's the centrepiece of the University of Melbourne's revamped Dookie campus, located near Shepparton.The dairy is teaching agricultural students about futuristic methods of milk and food production, and facilitating research into emerging animal welfare issues. 

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