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Researchers at the University's Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences are working on a measure for dog anxiety.  While anxiety was once useful for dogs as a survival mechanism, in the modern world it can manifest as a dog behavioural problem requiring medication. Visions speaks with Dr Dennis Wormald, an animal behaviourist about the study that is addressing the need for a consistent test that can be compared across clinics and measure canine anxiety. 

Scientists have shown for the first time that when insect larvae follow a leader to forage for food, both leaders and followers benefit, growing much faster than if they are in a group of only leaders or only followers. The work gives new insight into why such social relationships evolve in insects, and why they are maintained.

Farms with windbreaks with significant areas of ground cover vegetation have been shown to attract wasps that are beneficial to agricultural pest control, according to a new study from the University of Melbourne.

Four new research studies suggest that Australia’s recent droughts and heat waves of record-breaking seasons of 2013 were virtually impossible without the influence of global warming. And at its most conservative, the evidence showed that the record hot year of 2013 was made 2000 times more likely by global warming.

The University's environmental scientist and newest Professorial Fellow, Professor Tim Flannery tells Bloomberg's Angie Lau that the impact of ongoing extreme weather events has brought to a head the need for urgent global action on climate change.

A new study into meat tenderness could refine the way Australians cook steak.

Professor Robyn Warner is a founding member of the Meat Standards Australia (MSA) Scientific Committee and she solves scientific problems from paddock to plate for the meat industry. Professor Warner and her colleagues at CSIRO and Canada wanted to understand the broad variations in meat tenderness. So they cooked a single muscle fibre (cell) under a confocal microscope and it led to a new theory on muscle shrinkage during cooking.  It has changed the current meat science dogma that it is driven by connective tissue.

It used to be that computer models of weather events such as thunderstorms could only be run using powerful - and expensive - supercomputers. Now, however, these kinds of models can be run on the humble laptop. This episode explores this democratisation of weather modelling using the example of a spectacular thunderstorm called 'Hector the Convector'. Dr Chris Chambers produced a computer model of this thunderstorm on his laptop, and shows us how accurate it is by running it side-by-side with a timelapse video of the actual thunderstorm.

It used to be that computer models of weather events such as thunderstorms could only be run using supercomputers. But now these kinds of models can be run on the humble laptop. Visions explores this democratisation of weather modelling using the example of a spectacular thunderstorm called 'Hector the Convector', a daily occurance off the coast of Darwin.

Scientists have sequenced the genome and characterised the genes of the Asian liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini.  This parasite causes diseases that affect millions of people in Asia and is associated with a fatal bile duct cancer. 

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