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Leading Australian researchers have welcomed an announcement today by the Australian Government of $42M in funding for the development of a bionic eye capable of restoring vision to the blind.

Thousands of pairs of female twins are needed for a world-first cervical cancer study.
More than 7000 pairs of female twins from around Australia are needed to help explore the link between cervical cancer and the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV).

An international agreement to develop and commercialise the world’s first vaccine to prevent and treat severe gum disease periodontitis, has been announced today.

The recruitment and retention of Indigenous medical students is vital to closing the Indigenous health gap, according to Foundation Chair in Indigenous Health at the University of Melbourne Professor Ian Anderson.

A focus on early intervention and ensuring adequate case workers are available would be the most effective response to this week’s Ombudsmen Victoria’s report into child protection services says Professor Cathy Humphreys.

A major report investigating Victorian children’s perspective on the experience of homelessness, recommends no moves and no evictions to reduce the problem of childhood homelessness.

 
Almost half of the people from non-English speaking backgrounds have experienced discrimination, resulting in poorer health outcomes, research from the University of Melbourne and the Victorian Equal Opportunity and Human Rights Commission has found.

The University of Melbourne will ensure its graduates have capabilities, skills and familiarity with Indigenous peoples and issues with the launch of a new Institute.

Indigenous mothers removed from their natural families during childhood are significantly more likely than other Indigenous mothers to be victims of violence according to a new report led by Dr Kyllie Cripps from the University of Melbourne’s School of Population Health.

Indigenous mothers removed from their natural families during childhood are significantly more likely than other Indigenous mothers to be victims of violence according to a new report led by Dr Kyllie Cripps from the University of Melbourne’s School of Population Health.

Dr Cripps analysis of data from the 2002 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island Social Survey found mothers of the Stolen Generation living in remote areas were three times as likely to experience violence as other Indigenous mothers.

“These findings are troubling and add to accumulating evidence of the lasting impacts of removing young children from their families,” she says.

Dr Cripps says it’s also important to recognise that violence against women in Indigenous community is a national problem, and not restricted to remote communities.

“Our study suggests that women with young children who live in cities and towns are actually more likely to experience violence than those in remote communities.  This is not a problem confined to particular parts of Australia or a handful of communities.”

Dr Cripps says her report, published this week in the Medical Journal of Australia, is the first study to analyse population-level data about violence against women in Indigenous communities.

“It is an enormous problem and there are no easy solutions,” says Dr Cripps.

“But there are some violence prevention measures that we know work.  An important first step is to ensure that these services are both accessible to Indigenous women and organised in ways that are culturally appropriate.”

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