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Epilepsy researchers from around the world have examined the DNA of more than 45 000 people, leading to the discovery of 11 genes associated with the disorder and pointing the way to drugs that might benefit millions of patients who do not respond to existing treatments.

Australian researchers have developed a tiny device that electrically stimulates the brain and could one day be used to treat conditions such as epilepsy and Parkinson’s disease without invasive surgery.

Health workers are being urged to closely monitor adolescents losing weight after a study of patients with anorexia nervosa found 31 per cent had all the cognitive features and physical complications of the disease without being underweight.

Australian researchers have shown that forearm arteries are more effective in coronary bypass surgery than the commonly used leg vein, in a finding that could improve the prognosis for many heart patients.

Researchers have unlocked details revealing how brains change in people with schizophrenia and evidence suggesting that in the early stages of the illness the brain may be compensating for damage caused.

A new research training centre based at the University of Melbourne will advance and deploy new technologies that will remove long-standing barriers to drug discovery and development.

Programs working with men who perpetrate family violence are among projects to be discussed at a University of Melbourne-led conference this week.

Rates of blindness and vision loss among Indigenous Australians continue to improve significantly, seven years after University of Melbourne ophthalmologist Hugh Taylor started his plan to tackle Indigenous eye health.

Australia’s most common sexually transmitted infection, chlamydia, is unlikely to be eliminated by opportunistic testing in general practice, a landmark trial has revealed, with researchers recommending greater emphasis on improving chlamydia management.

Men with particular cancers generally fare worse than women with the same cancers, new Australian research has found.

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