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Deaths from viral Hepatitis B and C have surpassed HIV/AIDS in many countries, including Australia and in Western Europe, according to an analysis of the 2010 Global Burden of Disease study.

Visions this week takes to the high seas with researchers from the Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, who work with disabled patients and teach them how to sail. Professor Norman Saunders and PhD Candidate Maree Ellul are helping disabled people to sail, working with the Victorian Spinal Cord Service at Royal Talbot Rehabilitation Centre and Docklands Sailing Club.  

Coinciding with the launch of a dedicated Lung Health Research Centre, researchers at the University of Melbourne have discovered a new insight into the unexplained link between lung infections, emphysema and lung cancer.

A new University of Melbourne study has found that women who take iron supplements, experience a marked improvement in their exercise performance.

Eye health expert Professor Hugh Taylor AC, Melbourne Laureate Professor and the Harold Mitchell Chair of Indigenous Eye Health at the University of Melbourne has been named President of the International Council of Ophthalmology (ICO).

An international team of researchers including University of Melbourne staff has identified the exact biochemical key that awakes the body’s immune cells and sends them into fight against bacteria and fungi.

English-speaking white people are more likely to ‘self-segregate’ or ‘stick together’, new research has found.

Collaborative research on mental health issues, from schizophrenia to disaster mental health, will be the focus of a new University of Melbourne and Peking University centre to be launched in Beijing today.

A new discovery showing how hair growth activated fat tissue growth in the skin below the hair follicle could lead to the development of a cream to dissolve fat.
In particular, the protein that activated hair follicle growth was shown to also inhibit fat production.

Up to 50 per cent of women aged between 16 – 25 years may be putting themselves at risk of chronic illness and disease because of their lack of sun exposure.

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