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Female participants aged between 16 and 50 are being asked to try I-DECIDE, the first Australian online interactive tool designed to provide practical and confidential support to victims of domestic violence.

Despite an annual public investment of more than $3 billion, nobody knows how many people cycle through Australia’s prisons each year.

The first large-scale, direct evidence on smoking and mortality in Australia shows up to 1.8 million of our 2.7 million smokers are likely to die from their habit if they continue to smoke, losing on average ten years of life expectancy.

A medical coaching program developed at the University of Melbourne for patients with cardiovascular disease and/or type 2 diabetes successfully reduced risk factors in both Indigenous and non-Indigenous populations.

The University of Melbourne is celebrating its three Fulbright Scholars – an expert in Global Paediatric Health, an Emergency Medicine specialist and a world leader in International Humanitarian and Criminal Law – after receiving their awards at a presentation dinner last night in Perth.

Training in public health policy and leadership, improving disability programs and lessons from Australian in tobacco plain packaging policies are some of the collaborative projects in a new Memorandum of Understanding between the University of Melbourne and the Public Health Foundation of India (PHFI).

National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) has announced the appointment of prominent microbiologist, University of Melbourne alumna and Honorary Professor Anne Kelso AO as their new Chief Executive Officer to commence in April 2015.

For the first time, scientists have sequenced the genetic code of Toxocara canis, a roundworm that causes disease in humans and animals, which paves the way for new drugs, vaccines and diagnostic tests.

Researchers from the University of Melbourne have found that screening for bowel cancer in genetically high-risk populations should begin early.

A team of international scientists has discovered a new mechanism by which immune cells in the skin act as the body’s ‘border control’, revealing how these cells sense whether lipid or fat-like molecules might indicate the presence of foreign invaders.

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