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Three years after the launch of the roadmap to close the gap for vision, progress has been made but “much remains to be done”, according to the authors of a Perspective published online today by the Medical Journal of Australia.

An international study led by The University of Melbourne has confirmed that long-term regular taking of aspirin or ibuprofen reduces the risk of bowel cancer by more than half for people with the genetic mutation causing Lynch syndrome.

An international research team, led by the University of Melbourne, have discovered a way to control the stem cell behaviour responsible for the spread of bowel cancer.

Qantas has teamed up with University of Melbourne physiotherapists to introduce an exercise video on all international flights to help prevent deep vein thrombosis (DVT).

An international team of scientists, led by the University of Melbourne, has decoded the genes of Klebsiella pneumoniae (KP), a bacterium found in hospitals throughout the developing and developed world

A team of University of Melbourne physicists and doctors are developing life-saving oxygen supply machines that continue working even during power cuts, to treat young children with pneumonia in developing countries.   

New research from The Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity published in Nature today has revealed surprising differences in how each of the four types of influenza that cause seasonal viruses is spread.

Research findings published recently in Nature and revealing new insights into the genetic mechanisms ovarian cancer employs to evade chemotherapy drugs, have opened up the potential for the development of new treatments for women with high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma (HSC). 

Ex-prisoners with a history of risky drug use, mental illness or poverty are more likely to end up back behind bars, a new University of Melbourne study has revealed. And those who are obese, are chronically ill or have attempted suicide are more likely to remain in the community, the research found. 

Doctors in Victoria and New South Wales are more likely to immediately refer people with possible cancer for tests or to a specialist than those in comparable countries, new research published in BMJ Open has revealed.

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