Business and EconomicsSubscribe to Business and Economics

Australian teenagers with poor reading skills are no worse off than higher-achieving schoolmates when it comes to employment later on, a new study has found.

Computer science can help us understand why humans struggle with the complex dilemmas life throws at us – and why a better understanding of human problem-solving could help make computer ‘thinking’ more human-like, according to a new study out of the Brain, Minds and Markets Laboratory at the University of Melbourne.

Weddings celebrated on Valentine’s Day or special-number dates like 9/9/99 or 1/2/03 are 18 to 36 percent more likely to end in divorce than weddings on ordinary dates, according to a new study by leading University of Melbourne economists.

Mental illnesses are amongst the most common and disabling disorders in all of medicine, yet we have a very limited understanding of their medical basis.

An international conference examining inclusive energy solutions, being held at the University of Melbourne, will look at how access to energy can help reduce poverty, improve social inclusion, including balancing gender equity.

Australian businesses innovate more than they realise, and most are driven by a desire to better serve customers, new research by National Australia Bank (NAB) and University of Melbourne has found.

The crime rate, especially drug crime, decreases significantly when more 16-44 year olds have access to affordable Vocational Education and Training, (VET) according to a new University of Melbourne report.

The wealthiest households in Australia are couples over 65, who have experienced a real increase in median net wealth of almost 70% since 2002, according to Australia’s largest and most comprehensive household survey.

Increasing the pension age from 61 to 65 for women – making it the same access age for men – results in women spending longer in the labour force rather than seeking other welfare payments, according to University of Melbourne research.

Health delivery in many low to middle income countries is being compromised by private operators offering poor service by unqualified practitioners at exorbitant cost, according to a new Lancet Series co-edited by the University of Melbourne and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.